Lifestyle

A school that teaches life skills! Girls learn how to change tyres and check oil levels

Year 11s develop skills to become strong, independent and resourceful

Girl power comes in many different guises; whether it’s a Union Jack dress, protesting at an activists’ march, or being the CEO of a business.

It’s also the ability to fix a car without having to dart into a convenience store when breaking down at the side of a road to ask, ‘Is there a guy who can help?’

And one school is empowering their students to learn all about the vehicles they will soon drive, with lessons in car maintenance.

The Stella Maris College in Manly – a beach suburb in Sydney, Australia ­– is educating their Year 11s on a series of life skills they hope will prepare them for the outside world.

For the full car maintenance curriculum, the teenagers will complete the course knowing how to change a tyre, understand the most efficient way to check tyre pressure, how to best monitor oil and coolant levels, and what to do in the event of a car accident.

The initiative kicked off after Galmatic, an organisation that encourages people to ‘know your car’, reached out to the school to gauge interest of possible student workshops.

The proposal complemented the school’s ethos to be strong, independent and resourceful young women, so they joined forces to help the teens become road ready.

Speaking about the project, Assistant Principal for Wellbeing, Amy Smith, said the students benefited from sessions and found the practical skills to be a valuable exercise.

She said: “We had three groups of roughly 40 girls in what we call an incursion (event on school grounds).

“The feedback was very positive, the ladies from Galmatic were very patient and thorough in what they were explaining.

“All the staff and our Principal, Elizabeth Carnegie, felt a workshop like this would be beneficial for many reasons, mainly skills the girls need to learn before they leave school.

“It was also important to show the girls that they have the capabilities to handle situations themselves once they are on the road, rather than rely on someone else.”

Meanwhile, Eleni Mitakos, who has run Galmatic for 13 years, revealed the company teaches up to 100,000 teenagers each year in schools across all parts of Sydney.

Chatting to Daily Mail Australia, she said: “The primary aim is for teenagers to feel comfortable behind the wheel. Ultimately, they are driving very big vehicles which can be very expensive if not looked after properly.

“We can’t stress enough to all our students, you should never ignore a problem with your car, you need to address it for your own safety.”

Looks like we might need a session with Galmatic ourselves to save on garage bills!

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