Feast your eyes on magical painting that is breaking records as world’s largest canvas

An artist has put paint to canvas to create an incredible masterpiece fit for any wall.

Only, putting it on the wall might be a problem.

For the record-breaking painting has achieved status as the world’s largest canvas and covers over 1800 square meters – that’s nine tennis courts.

The eye-popping artwork, which will be auctioned off for charity in Dubai, was the brainchild of Sacha Jafari who decided to devise a piece to celebrate humanity.

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Named ‘The Journey of Humanity’, the aim is to connect 1billion people around the world by becoming the largest social, artistic and philanthropic project in history.

Once finished, the painting will be split into 60 panels, before being individually named, numbered, catalogued, framed, then sold.

All proceeds from the auction sales with go towards supporting the sectors of education, connectivity and wellbeing for those in the poorest and most in-need areas of the world.

Speaking about the project, Sacha says his ultimate aim is to save the lives of 10million children who desperately need our help.

Explaining the picture, the British artist said: “The Journey of Humanity, part one, is the soul of the earth. This represents the energy rising up.”

Sacha continued: “Part two is nature, the mountains, the rivers, the trees, the lakes.

“For part three, it’s the arrival of humanity. This shows the journey of the child, with the love and nurture of the mother and guidance and protection of the father.

“The fourth section, we move into the solar system. The dark purple skies, the twinkling stars, the planets revolving, and this section reminds us how small we are in the universe. Only when we remind ourselves of this, can we realise what we can become.”

He added: “Then the solar system will bleed back into the soul of the earth, and reconnect us, humanity, to ourselves, each other, and ultimately, the soul of the earth.”

The fascinating piece took seven months to complete, with a gruelling 18 hours a day, and over 1,200 gallons of paint and in excess of 1,000 brushes.

Now that’s a masterpiece.