Extraordinary graffiti is sanitising air with smog-cleaning pigments

The future is officially here. And we’re not talking about the latest iPhone model.

Smart art has arrived in the guise of murals that are sanitising the air with special sun-activated and smog-cleaning pigments.

The project – which kickstarted in Bangkok, Thailand and is spreading globally – is set to make such an impact on the environment it will be equal to planting 3,000 trees.

[Credit: Good Looking Studio]

Thanks to the handiwork of local artists teaming up with Converse as part of their City-Forests campaign, each mural purifies the surrounding air equivalent to 720 trees.

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By using photocatalytic paint with titanium dioxide, it attracts airborne pollutants before converting them into harmless nitrates through a chemical process involving sunlight.

Prior to the City-Forests campaign, Dutch designer Studio Roosegaarde experimented with the same photocatalytic paint for a series of billboards in Monterrey, Mexico whereby each billboard generates the same clean air as 30 trees every six hours.

Following Bangkok’s footsteps, Polish artists Maciek Polak and Dawid Ryski designed a creation for their streets in Warsaw which features a family of smiling daisies rising amongst skyscraper buildings alongside the quote, ‘create together for tomorrow’.

Speaking about the artwork, a project spokesperson said: “For the time being [with coronavirus], everything has slowed down.

“At Converse, we saw this as an opportunity to speak up and help produce fresh air through painting murals.”

In what is almost the reverse of this project, fellow environmentally-friendly organisation AIR-INK collect air pollution and transform it into ink.

Their process involves using carbon soot from a car’s exhaust, before processing it into a high-quality black ink.

Other places to take part in the City-Forests initiative include Belgrade, Lima, Sydney, Jakarta, Manila, Sao Paulo, Santiago, Johannesburg, Melbourne, and Panama City.

We hope they come to the UK soon!