Moving dementia campaign shows how to get support for families who live in lockdown permanently

While life in lockdown has been a struggle for many of us, the reality is that we are slowly beginning to return to some kind of normality.

However, for those living with dementia or caring for people with dementia, their reality is a very different one.

And now Dementia UK is shining a light on what people experiencing the condition endure daily not just during quarantine, with new campaign Lives On Hold.

While dementia is typically thought of as people losing their memories, it is an umbrella term used to describe a range of progressive neurological disorders that affect the brain.

The campaign aims to reach thousands of families living with dementia who are unaware of advice and support on offer through their specialist Admiral Nurses Helpline.

Admiral nurses are specialist dementia nurses who support families in need, especially when life gets challenging. They offer one-to-one support, expert guidance and practical solutions by creating a lifeline to help families live more positively with the illness.

As part of the initiative, the charity called on some familiar faces to raise awareness and show how similar the coronavirus pandemic is for those living with dementia permanently, with carers often confined to the house as they cannot leave their loved-one alone which often leads to becoming increasingly isolated from friends and society.

The video sees actor Jim Broadbent, actress Phyllis Logan, athlete Adelle Tracey, reality star Georgia Kousoulou and musician Naughty Boy unite to share their experiences.

Speaking about her involvement, The Only Way Is Essex star Georgia – whose grandmother has dementia – said: “What I miss most about life before lockdown is just the freedom to see family and friends. I’ve literally taken so much for granted.

“Dementia is such a sad, sad thing, and unless you experience it first-hand, you don’t really understand.”

Meanwhile, Naughty Boy – real name Shahid Khan – said: “The reason my album has been delayed over the last few years is that I have made mum a priority.”

He added: “With mum, with dementia, it’s the music that recreates memories that really makes her the happiest.”

And national treasure Jim Broadbent, who lost his mother to dementia, added: “I think lockdown heightens the predicament of carers of people with dementia for all of us and makes us more aware of what the carers go through an awful lot of the time, year after year. It’s a vital service that Dementia UK and Admiral Nurses provide.”

Devastating statistics state that 1 in 3 people born in the UK this year will develop dementia in their lifetime, with 850,000 people currently living with dementia in Britain.

For more info, visit Dementia UK: Live On Hold.