Housemates rave for 26 hours in basement to raise huge sums for domestic abuse charity

If you’re the last one dancing at 3am when the club lights go up, then this stamina crew might just be your newfound heroes.

Three housemates partied for 26 hours in their basement to raise a whopping £6,340 at the time of publication for Solace Women’s Aid – a charity who supports those experiencing domestic abuse in London.

The trio were inspired by the 2.6 challenge, whereby participants are encouraged to devise an activity based around the numbers 2.6 or 26 that suits their skills and complete it on April 26 – when the 40th London Marathon would have taken place.

Lucy Furneaux, 25, Grace Marjot, 24, and Nathalie Dixon Young, 24, were motivated for their social distancing rave after the lockdown saw a worrying soar in abuse at home.

Speaking about their fundraiser, Grace, a trauma nurse, revealed: “I had a patient not too long ago who had been stabbed multiple times by her partner, she was in a situation where she had to be quarantined with this person.

“She was lucky enough to go back to a friend’s house, and it just made us think this was a really important cause, especially at this time.”

She added: “The first half went really smoothly but I certainly hit a wall and it became really difficult once your body gives up on you.

“Around 6am, I really started to feel it, and it felt like we had so long to go, and I felt so nauseous and I just started crying.

“But another wind hit me, and we really, really went for it for the last couple of hours.”

Speaking to PA News, flatmate Nathalie added: “2.6 hours of dancing didn’t seem like enough of a challenge, so we went fully the other way.”

Lucy added: “Solace needs £150,000 in extra resources during the crisis. It seemed like an easy way to do our thing for a charity that has really been hit hard.

“I think it’s the best thing I’ve ever done in my life.”

The housemates set up the disco via Zoom, so friends and family could cheer them on.

Rose McGowan recently spoke out on the issue, telling Good Morning Britain that the term domestic abuse undermines what goes on behind closed doors, as ‘domestic’ implies it is somehow lesser than the gravity of assault, rape, and murder that occurs.

During the COVID-19 crisis, domestic violence organisations have seen significant spikes in people logging onto their sites or calling their helplines for information.  

Home Secretary Priti Patel recently launched the #YouAreNotAlone campaign to support victims, while Refuge –  the UK’s largest domestic abuse charity – reported a 700% increase in calls to its helpline in a single day.

To donate to Solace Women’s Aid, click here.