First ever disabled dogs home to open and save thousands of lives

A woman is on a mission to save disabled dogs who are euthanised unnecessarily.

Victoria Bryceson is looking to build the UK’s first centre for disabled animals, where she will rehabilitate the most vulnerable before finding them their forever homes.

However, the founder of animal charity Miracle’s Mission needs help with the project and is looking to raise £20,000 via Crowdfunder to secure a deposit for a centre in Yorkshire.

Speaking to Uspire, Victoria said: “90% of disabled dogs that are seen by vets are euthanised unnecessarily so there must be literally thousands of dogs killed like this in the UK.

“Many people may not be aware that dogs who have wheels and prosthetics can live as good a life as a fully able-bodied dog and mistakenly think euthanasia is the only option.”

The new centre will provide dedicated care for the most vulnerable dogs and cats. Animals under its care will receive thorough veterinary assessments, MRIs, surgeries, the fitting of prosthetics, and doggy wheels. Their personalised rehabilitation plan will include physiotherapy and hydrotherapy as well as daily massage and TENS machine stimulation. 

The pampered pooches will also have access to a sensory garden and educational toys to provide adequate mental and physical stimulation from their specially trained carers.

The centre will begin treating dogs with disabilities, missing limbs and those who are paralysed. Many of them will need surgery to correct limbs and the aim with these dogs is that after surgery they will no longer be disabled. Even some of the paralysed dogs will leave no longer paralysed as if it is semi paralysis they can be helped to walk again. Where legs can’t be saved, prosthetics or wheels will be used to give the dogs a great quality of life.

Victoria said: “At the moment, amputation of one leg is common practice with UK vets, as dogs can live very well and still be very active with three legs, especially if it is a back leg, as most of the weight is on the front legs. 

“However, when it comes to double amputation leaving the dog with two legs, the vets that I have seen have said it’s not possible to do as dogs won’t have a good quality of life. 

“The specialist hospitals seem more open to it as they have more experience but even they have problems where most of their dogs in these conditions are euthanised, not because they need to be but because in their words it is the owners who can’t cope with the thought of a two-legged dog. There is a huge need for education amongst the public and vets.”

And Victoria is adamant that dogs using wheels and prosthetics can live a good life. 

She added: “The animals coming into our care will initially all be stray dogs with nowhere else to go and no one else to help them.

“They will either have been born with some sort of condition, such as a bent leg that they can’t walk on or they will have been in an accident – for example, hit by a car or they will have been abused.”

Once the furry residents have been emotionally and physically rehabilitated as much as possible, Miracle’s Mission will endeavour to find forever homes for each one of them. 

You can donate to Victoria’s appeal by clicking here.